Along the Appian Way

Monique warned us about Monday morning traffic, so the stop-and-go trip from Hotel Forum to the downtown Naples National Archaeological Museum was not a surprise. It was completely worth it, however, as the museum houses amazing relics unearthed from once-buried Pompeii and Herculaneum. Whole statues, vibrant mosaics, complete murals and unbroken household objects greeted us around every turn. We could have spent days there.

1-1. Luciano extolling the characteristics of idealistic Greek-Roman sculpture.jpg

Our guide Luciano extols the perfect characteristics of this idealistic Greek/Roman sculpture.

1c. Lararium -- a shrine to the guardian spirits of the Roman household

A brightly-colored mosaic ably sets off this lararium, a shrine to the guardian spirits of a Roman household.

1f. Musical instruments found in Pompeii

This collection of well-made and still-playable musical instruments certainly drew my interest.

1d. Realistic sculpture of Seneca, Nero's mentor

Contrasting with the idealistic school of Roman art is the realism technique, clearly demonstrated in this craggy, bristly bust of Seneca.

So much to see, so little time! Our goal of reaching Rome by dinner-time called us on to our lunchtime stop further up the coast at Putiola, ancient Rome’s primary port. It is also where Paul’s prison-bound trip to Rome landed (Acts 28:13) after ship-wrecking on Malta, so we gathered on the picturesque shore for a short study session on this story.2. Puteoli harbor where Paul landed on his way to prison in Rome.jpg

The Appian Way, one of the earliest and strategically most important Roman roads of the ancient republic, was our afternoon partner. It once connected Rome to Brindisi, in southeast Italy — we intersected it near Capua on the Tyrrhenian Sea and followed it right into the heart of Rome. We are now comfortably settled in our hotel and look forward to exploring across the city tomorrow.

appian way

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s