In the Mean Time …

1 Museum of Natural HistoryThis morning’s visit to the Museum of Natural History to view their collection of gems and minerals can be labeled a success.  Gerry (me, too) really enjoyed the displays

Gerry inspecting a mineral specimen; rainbow gemstones

Gerry inspecting a mineral specimen; rainbow gemstones

even though the English school children were there in full force, making the exhibits very crowded.  Having free access to these national treasures is a real boon for British educators.

IWM signNot a success was our plan to visit the Imperial War Museum; we arrived after lunch only to find an unwelcome sign.  In the mean time, saddened but resilient, we decided on a Thames River cruise all the way to Greenwich (known best for Greenwich Mean Time).  It was a lovely day with sunshine and warm temps, so cruising down the river was very pleasant and restful.

Once in Greenwich, we thoroughly enjoyed the sights that accompany the stately buildings of England’s royalty’s residences at Greenwich.  King Henry VII and Queen Mary II had a large complex built for seamen (It eventually served as an academy for the Royal Navy.), complete with a chapel, a pensioner’s hall, and a queen’s house all located together on acres and acres of park, now a nationally registered site.  A school of music and dance utilizes some of the buildings currently and we had the treat of listening to an adjudicated master singing class in the chapel while we wandered the nave.

4 Greenwich's Painted HallThe Painted Hall houses the largest ceiling painting in England and kept us awed for an hour, mostly because large rectangular mirrors on wheels were provided throughout the hall which you could move to whatever spot you chose and view the ceiling paintings w/o craning your neck.  Ingenious!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We also visited a Maritime Museum,

Gerry with the biggest ship-in-a-bottle in the world; the sails of said ship have vividly-designed sails.

Gerry with the biggest ship-in-a-bottle in the world; the sails of said ship have vividly colorful designs.

the Cutty Sark (the last of the swift clipper ships that plied trade from the Orient to the West),5e Cutty Sark and the Royal Observatory built on the Prime Meridian.

The white line marks the Prime Meridian, Zero Longitude.

The white line marks the Prime Meridian, Zero Longitude.

We were too late to actually stand with one leg in both time worlds, but we can say we were there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Our serendipitous visit to Greenwich made Evensong at Westminster Abbey impossible, but we did tour the heart of London at night, giving us a totally different view of things than a daytime visit.

Parliament Park at night

Tomorrow is Travel-Home Day.  London has been great (The weather was unseasonably sunny.) and we are glad to have visited, but it is time to be home.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s